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issue 148 september october 2020

This page shows the articles in issue 148 september october 2020 of GroundCover. As articles are developed and published online, the list below will grow until all articles are available.

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37 results found:
  • Sowing sorghum in spring offers growers farming system benefits
    Sowing sorghum in spring offers growers farming system benefits
    Issue 148, September-October 2020 - 09 Aug 2020

    Sowing sorghum in spring may not be the ‘risky business’ that many Central Queensland growers expect. Instead, cooler conditions improve yields and bring farming system benefits.

  • University's GRDC-invested rust research celebrates centenary
    University's GRDC-invested rust research celebrates centenary
    Issue 148, September-October 2020 - 08 Aug 2020

    Walter Waterhouse was awarded the Military Cross for gallantry in France during World War I. Upon his return to Australia, Professor Waterhouse initiated cereal rust research at the University of Sydney.

  • Consumer preference builds sorghum market
    Consumer preference builds sorghum market
    Issue 148, September-October 2020 - 07 Aug 2020

    Researchers are working to better understand sorghum consumption and broaden the potential for this key northern grain in Chinese, Indian and Australian markets.

  • Wheat sales push targets Chinese noodle makers
    Wheat sales push targets Chinese noodle makers
    Issue 148, September-October 2020 - 06 Aug 2020

    The Australian Export Grains Innovation Centre is working with grain buyers in China to sell the benefits of incorporating higher-quality Australian wheat classes for premium noodles. The process recently included a webinar featuring Australian grains experts.

  • Harvest gains through online networking
    Harvest gains through online networking
    Issue 148, September-October 2020 - 05 Aug 2020

    @Harvestloss is an exciting twitter platform that has been guiding growers in their quest to reduce grain losses at harvest time.

  • Nutritional value varies widely in novel flour products
    Nutritional value varies widely in novel flour products
    Issue 148, September-October 2020 - 03 Aug 2020

    The Grains & Legumes Nutrition Council has released new research on the composition of different flour products. It reveals big variations in the nutritional content of flours, as well as big differences in the amount of sodium they contain.

  • Soils research offers glimpse into plant reaction to nutrients
    Soils research offers glimpse into plant reaction to nutrients
    Issue 148, September-October 2020 - 02 Aug 2020

    Data from WA’s wheatbelt is suggesting deep ripping improves crop access to nitrogen fertiliser.

  • FAW’s genetics and insecticide sensitivities explored to develop pest management plans
    FAW’s genetics and insecticide sensitivities explored to develop pest management plans
    Issue 148, September-October 2020 - 01 Aug 2020

    In other parts of the world fall armyworm has developed resistance to commonly used insecticides, making management more difficult. In a GRDC-invested, CSIRO-led project, researchers aim to better understand this pest’s genetic make-up and insecticide sensitivities to develop effective pest management plans.

  • Researchers work to better understand FAW and identify RD&E further priorities
    Researchers work to better understand FAW and identify RD&E further priorities
    Issue 148, September-October 2020 - 31 Jul 2020

    GRDC has invested in cesar to lead a project investigating FAW biology, spread and establishment potential, and options for improving industry capability to manage the pest now, and into the future.

  • Gene discovery to fight canola crop virus
    Gene discovery to fight canola crop virus
    Issue 148, September-October 2020 - 30 Jul 2020

    A global hunt is underway to discover genes that provide resistance to the Turnip Yellow Virus, with exciting discoveries already occurring in canola research

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