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issue 151 march april 2021

This page shows the articles in issue 151 march april 2021 of GroundCover. As articles are developed and published online, the list below will grow until all articles are available.

GroundCover is also distributed every two months via mail. If you would like to subscribe to receive the hardcopy magazine, visit our subscription page.

31 results found:
  • Long-term no-till trial delivers data legacy
    Long-term no-till trial delivers data legacy
    Issue 151, March-April 2021 - 24 Mar 2021

    A long-term trial undertaken by the Western Australian No-Tillage Farmers Association has not only provided significant insights for growers into the principles of conservation agriculture practices, but also added to the international science base and trained future systems-thinking scientists.

  • Tackling acidity becomes a mine field for SA family
    Tackling acidity becomes a mine field for SA family
    Issue 151, March-April 2021 - 22 Mar 2021

    South Australian grower Scott Crettenden has developed a lime sand mine on one of his properties near Karkoo which is helping tackle widespread, increasing soil acidification on the Eyre Peninsula.

  • Sorghum’s wild cousins need protection
    Sorghum’s wild cousins need protection
    Issue 151, March-April 2021 - 20 Mar 2021

    New research published in the journal Diversity and Distributions has found that most wild sorghum species are found in northern and western Australia and Queensland. Five species are found in Africa and Asia and one is found in the Americas.

  • New stripe rust challenges
    New stripe rust challenges
    Issue 151, March-April 2021 - 19 Mar 2021

    An important part of keeping one step ahead of ever-changing fungal rust pathogens has been to monitor the pathotypes that occur in Australia and to determine their impact on current and yet-to-be-released cultivars. This approach has been particularly successful in meeting the challenges posed by new rust pathotypes that arise locally via, for example, random mutation.

  • Oats to be supercharged as GRDC ups the ante
    Oats to be supercharged as GRDC ups the ante
    Issue 151, March-April 2021 - 17 Mar 2021

    As Gary Lang’s highest profit earner and with reasonable frost resistance, oats have become a regular part of his cropping rotation at Wickepin in Western Australia. This drives Gary’s keen interest in GRDC’s announcement of a comprehensive boost to oat improvement.

  • Moves to secure oats’ food status
    Moves to secure oats’ food status
    Issue 151, March-April 2021 - 16 Mar 2021

    A GRDC-supported project aims to improve oat agronomy and evaluate domestically and internationally sourced germplasm. The project comes as Australia boosts its international oats markets.

  • To seal or not to seal
    To seal or not to seal
    Issue 151, March-April 2021 - 15 Mar 2021

    The aim and sole purpose of sealable silos is to ensure that successful fumigations to control insects. There is no other purpose or time a silo should be sealed.

  • Yardstick projects provide feedback on nutrition
    Yardstick projects provide feedback on nutrition
    Issue 151, March-April 2021 - 12 Mar 2021

    Demonstration sites over two seasons across Western Australia have shown that little consistent evidence that crop varieties respond differently to nutrition strategies. However, results were highly variable and season and location specific highlighting the importance for growers to consider adjusting their fertiliser strategy throughout the year to increase yield or improve grain quality, and ensure inputs are not wasted by the crop.

  • Giving Australian feed grain a push in South-East Asia
    Giving Australian feed grain a push in South-East Asia
    Issue 151, March-April 2021 - 09 Mar 2021

    Webinars presented by the Australian Export Grains Innovation Centre have presented to South-East Asian buyers the benefits of using Australian feed grains for pig production. The most recent webinars targeted buyers in the Philippines and Thailand.

  • Some practices may need tweaking to maintain sorghum production
    Some practices may need tweaking to maintain sorghum production
    Issue 151, March-April 2021 - 08 Mar 2021

    Climate change is reducing sorghum’s yield potential, but there is still room to reduce the yield gap through adapted agronomic practices that counteract this decline

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