The week that was: Sunday, September 1 - Saturday, September 7

The week that was: Sunday, September 1 - Saturday, September 7

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Emerald agronomist Josh Bell was particularly interested in trial results from the high nutrition and high fertility treatments undertaken as part of the northern farming systems initiative research investment. Photo GRDC.

Emerald agronomist Josh Bell was particularly interested in trial results from the high nutrition and high fertility treatments undertaken as part of the northern farming systems initiative research investment. Photo GRDC.

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Here are your five most-read articles from the week that was.

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There was plenty happening across the Australian grains industry over this past week.

Here, we take a look back at the top stories you read from Sunday, September 1 - Saturday, September 7.

Central Queensland agronomist questions what's possible with Nitrogen

Central Highlands agronomist Josh Bell regularly questions `what's possible' on a crop yield front if growers reconsider their approach to nitrogen (N) applications across the entire farming system.

He suspects additional strategic N applications based on system requirements rather than simply a crop-by-crop basis could potentially deliver greater overall farm productivity and profitability.

This theory has been tested over the past five years as part of a major grains research investment into the long-term impacts on productivity, profitability and soil health under different farming systems. Read the full story here.

Optimised Canola Profitability information sessions roadshow rolls out across Victoria, South Australia

GRDC Grower Relations Manager South, Randall Wilksch, says the Optimised Canola Profitability project has produced comprehensive guidelines for canola growers across eastern Australia. Photo: GRDC

GRDC Grower Relations Manager South, Randall Wilksch, says the Optimised Canola Profitability project has produced comprehensive guidelines for canola growers across eastern Australia. Photo: GRDC

Five years of canola research across eastern Australia will come together to provide growers with critical insights into sowing time, growth periods and flowering, and agronomic tactics - as part of the Optimised Canola Profitability information sessions roadshow across Victoria and South Australia.

Expert researchers will deliver the one-day workshops directly to growers and farm advisers, covering topics such as: when canola should flower; matching sowing date and variety to ensure the crop flowers at the right time; the critical growth period for canola; optimising canola crop growth; and the key agronomic tactics to maximise yield. Read the full story here.

New study shows 31 pests and pathogens cause wheat cropping losses

Cropping losses in wheat due to leaf rust tend to be lower than those caused by stem rust and stripe rust but on a worldwide basis, leaf rust (pictured) is generally considered the most damaging wheat rust disease. PHOTO University of Sydney

Cropping losses in wheat due to leaf rust tend to be lower than those caused by stem rust and stripe rust but on a worldwide basis, leaf rust (pictured) is generally considered the most damaging wheat rust disease. PHOTO University of Sydney

A recent publication in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolutionestimates that diseases reduce global wheat production by about 21 per cent.

The study used an expert-based assessment of crop health, documenting losses caused by some 137 pathogens and pests associated not just with wheat but also with rice, maize, potato and soybeans.

In wheat, 31 pests and pathogens were identified as problematic. These included 17 fungi, nine invertebrates, four viruses and one phytoplasma.

Of these 31 pests and pathogens, the study found that just four accounted for half of all wheat cropping losses. Leaf rust was the most damaging, followed by Fusarium head blight (scab), septoria tritici blotch and stripe (yellow) rust. Read the full story here.

Public expectations on herbicides difficult to manage, consultant says

Consultant Mark Congreve spoke about the future of chemical use in Australia at the 2019 Australian Summer Grains Conference. PHOTO Rebecca Thyer

Consultant Mark Congreve spoke about the future of chemical use in Australia at the 2019 Australian Summer Grains Conference. PHOTO Rebecca Thyer

Public expectations around herbicide use are likely to become more difficult to manage, Mark Congreve, a consultant with the Independent Consultants Australia Network (ICAN), told delegates at the 2019 Australian Summer Grains Conference.

Speaking about the future of chemical use in Australia, Mr Congreve said legal and political decisions, not scientific ones, could start to influence their use. Read the full story here.

International conference frames photosynthesis as the engine of future food security

Professor Robert Furbank, director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Translational Photosynthesis. PHOTO Natalia Bateman

Professor Robert Furbank, director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Translational Photosynthesis. PHOTO Natalia Bateman

Over 100 photosynthesis researchers from around the world met in Brisbane in early July to participate in the inaugural Translational Photosynthesis Conference: Innovations in Agriculture for Food Security.

The conference covered a wide spectrum of the approaches being used around the world to develop photosynthesis-based traits that breeders can use to drive up rates of yield gains.

The conference was sponsored by GRDC and convened by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Translational Photosynthesis.

Centre director, Professor Robert Furbank, from the Australian National University (ANU), says the conference was organised to reflect the scale of the challenge across the breadth of the research, development and delivery pipeline that puts better performing varieties into the hands of growers. Read the full story here.

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