The week that was: Sunday, July 14 - Saturday, July 20

The week that was: Sunday, July 14 - Saturday, July 20

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At the Southern NSW Farming Ball were Acting Prime Minister Michael McCormack, FarmLink chair Lisa Anderson, FarmLink chief executive officer Cindy Cassidy, NSW Member for Cootamundra, Steph Cooke and retired Corporal Mark Donaldson, VC. PHOTO: Nicole Baxter

At the Southern NSW Farming Ball were Acting Prime Minister Michael McCormack, FarmLink chair Lisa Anderson, FarmLink chief executive officer Cindy Cassidy, NSW Member for Cootamundra, Steph Cooke and retired Corporal Mark Donaldson, VC. PHOTO: Nicole Baxter

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Here's what you might have missed this past week.

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There was plenty happening across the Australian grains industry over this past week.

Here, we take a look back at the top stories you read from Sunday, July 14 to Saturday, July 20.

New research and training facilities launched in style: A massive machinery shed was transformed into a glittering ballroom to celebrate grain growers and all they contribute to Australia and beyond.

The Treflé Exhibition Shed, built with investment from GRDC and the Temora Shire Council, recently hosted more than 370 growers and members of the grains industry for the Southern NSW Farming Ball.

Acting Prime Minister Michael McCormack opened the night, saying the ball was a celebration of farmers and their role in feeding the world. Read the full story, and see the gallery here.

A barley leaf affected by ramularia leaf spot, showing the rectangular brown spots surrounded by yellow margins. PHOTO Neil Havis, Scotland's Rural College

A barley leaf affected by ramularia leaf spot, showing the rectangular brown spots surrounded by yellow margins. PHOTO Neil Havis, Scotland's Rural College

High-rainfall growers warned to watch for ramularia leaf spot during season: Grain growers in Tasmania and the high-rainfall areas of Western Australia are encouraged to keep an eye out for the disease ramularia leaf spot, which causes yield losses to barley crops.

Ramularia leaf spot, caused by the fungal pathogen Ramularia collo-cygni, was confirmed in Tasmania in 2016.

Nick Poole, managing director of Foundation for Arable Research (FAR) Australia, first discovered ramularia leaf spot in Launceston in 2016. The pathogen reappeared in 2018, just a few paddocks away from the 2016 infection site. Read the full story here.

Western Australian growers visited the Canterbury Plains in New Zealand to learn about strategies for growing hyper-yielding cereal crops. PHOTO Nicky Tesoriero

Western Australian growers visited the Canterbury Plains in New Zealand to learn about strategies for growing hyper-yielding cereal crops. PHOTO Nicky Tesoriero

WA grower tour focus on trans-Tasman high yielding crops: Hyper-yielding cereals, commonly found in New Zealand and Tasmania, could be the future for Western Australia's southern grain-growing regions.

But, according to Agronomy Focus consultant Quenten Knight, greater investment in breeding cultivars with shorter vernalisation periods is needed to find varieties that suit the southern WA climate.

Mr Knight and a group of growers and agronomists recently returned from a GRDC-invested tour of New Zealand's Canterbury Plains, an area that regularly receives 600 millimetres of annual rainfall. Read the full story here.

Bongeen grower John Cameron uses TeeJet TTI 110-02 air-induction nozzles to disperse ultra-coarse droplets which comply with new regulations surrounding the use of 2,4-D. PHOTO Liz Wells

Bongeen grower John Cameron uses TeeJet TTI 110-02 air-induction nozzles to disperse ultra-coarse droplets which comply with new regulations surrounding the use of 2,4-D. PHOTO Liz Wells

New guidelines for using 2,4-D promote efficiency and responsibility, grower says:Seasons permitting, the intensity of summer and winter cropping is at its greatest anywhere in Australia on the Darling Downs of southern Queensland.

Here, dryland cotton is the second-most-popular summer crop behind sorghum and the most susceptible to damage from drift from all Group I herbicides, including 2,4-D (2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid).

With as little as one metre separating cotton from fallow or neighbouring plantings, it is a crop which, like grapevines and vegetables, can suffer collateral damage from phenoxy herbicides, the primary active ingredients in spray mixes used to control broadleaf weeds in summer fallow. Read the full story here.

A drift reduction guide for spray operators has been released by GRDC explaining how new restrictions to the use of 2,4-D will impact on-farm applications. PHOTO GRDC

A drift reduction guide for spray operators has been released by GRDC explaining how new restrictions to the use of 2,4-D will impact on-farm applications. PHOTO GRDC

Growers and advisers can access practical resource to optimise spray efficacy: Grain growers and spray operators can now access a practical guide explaining how to maintain efficacy when using coarser spray qualities in line with new restrictions to the use of 2,4-D.

The guide has been developed by the GRDC to assist industry understand the on-farm implications of the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA) decision to suspend the labels of all products containing the active ingredient 2,4-D from October 4 2018, replacing them with a permit.

The action by the APMVA was taken in response to widespread damage over several years to sensitive crops, such as grapes, horticultural crops, summer pulses and cotton. Read the full story here.

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