The week that was: June 2 - June 8

The week that was: June 2 - June 8

Latest News
Aa

Here's what you might have missed from across the grains industry this past week.

Aa
Gordon Brownhill, right, has handed over the research chairmanship role at AMPS Research to Tom Simson, left. PHOTO Supplied

Gordon Brownhill, right, has handed over the research chairmanship role at AMPS Research to Tom Simson, left. PHOTO Supplied

There was plenty happening across the Australian grains industry over this past week.

Here, we take a look back at the top stories you read from June 2 to June 8.

AMPS Research handover signals local R&D still seen as vital: Multi-species cover cropping trials in northern New South Wales are underway to see if the practice can build stored soil moisture and improve soil health.

AMPS Research is conducting the trials under new research chair Tom Simson, who is excited about the trial's prospects. Read the full story here.

Some of the Bellata Farming Group spent two weeks in India and Bangladesh earlier this year to learn more about chickpea markets. Pictured here, from left to right, are Kevin Schwager, Drew Penberthy, Ian Gourley, Steven Gleeson, Australian High Commissioner for Bangladesh Julia Niblett, Tim O'Brien, Jock Cameron, Bruce Kirkby and Geoff O'Neill. PHOTO Supplied

Some of the Bellata Farming Group spent two weeks in India and Bangladesh earlier this year to learn more about chickpea markets. Pictured here, from left to right, are Kevin Schwager, Drew Penberthy, Ian Gourley, Steven Gleeson, Australian High Commissioner for Bangladesh Julia Niblett, Tim O'Brien, Jock Cameron, Bruce Kirkby and Geoff O'Neill. PHOTO Supplied

Bellata Farming Group explored chickpea demand during Indian tour: A desire to better understand India, Australia's largest market for chickpeas, prompted a group of northern NSW grain growers to travel to that country - and emerging trading partner Bangladesh - earlier this year.

With partial GRDC investment, eight members of the Bellata Farming Group spent two weeks in India and Bangladesh in late February and early March. Read the full story here.

UWA School of Engineering agricultural engineer Dr Andrew Guzzomi. PHOTO Ryan Early, Reflected Image Productions

UWA School of Engineering agricultural engineer Dr Andrew Guzzomi. PHOTO Ryan Early, Reflected Image Productions

Mechanical chipper to change face of fallow weed control across Australias broadacre grains industry: A new mechanical weeding machine may help change the face of fallow weed control across Australia's broadacre grains industry.

The Weed Chipper, developed by agricultural engineers and researchers from the University of Western Australia (UWA) and the University of Sydney, may be the next answer in the fight against herbicide-resistant weeds. Read the full story here.

Pointed snails aestivating on higher ground in summer. PHOTO CSIRO

Pointed snails aestivating on higher ground in summer. PHOTO CSIRO

Snail biocontrol agent sought from different shores:While the pointed or conical snail (Cochlicella acuta) generally does not directly damage crops, it can be a major grain contaminant that costs growers millions of dollars annually.

In Australia, it is one of four species of introduced Mediterranean land snails that cause damage to broadacre crops.

To avoid high temperatures, the snail climbs on vegetation to aestivate and is then harvested with grain. Read the full story here.

Peter Carberry is presented with traditional dress by local women in Gwarmai village, in northern Nigeria, who are promoting sorghum products as Smart Food. PHOTO H. Ajeigbe

Peter Carberry is presented with traditional dress by local women in Gwarmai village, in northern Nigeria, who are promoting sorghum products as Smart Food. PHOTO H. Ajeigbe

Dr Peter Carberry is bringing Australian innovation to the challenge of world hunger: India may seem a long way from his upbringing on a grain and cotton farm in Narrabri, New South Wales, but not to Dr Peter Carberry.

"Our systems are not so different. Innovation in Australian agriculture benefits world agriculture, and vice versa," Dr Carberry says.

He is well known to Australian growers for agricultural systems modelling and helping growers to interpret the interaction between climate forecasting and soil moisture management, particularly in the northern region where he spent 24 years with CSIRO, based in Toowoomba. Read the full story here.

Anne and Peter Carberry visit the Taj Mahal during Peters first trip to ICRISAT in India in 1983. PHOTO Peter Carberry

Anne and Peter Carberry visit the Taj Mahal during Peters first trip to ICRISAT in India in 1983. PHOTO Peter Carberry

Aa