Prepare to tackle and report pests and diseases: Reel gallery of critters in crops

PestFax service starts in west: See what pests and pathogens may be present

Diseases
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WA grain growers encouraged to monitor and report pests and diseases to help map risks.

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PestFax is an informative and interactive reporting service that covers pests and diseases threatening crops and pastures throughout the grainbelt of Western Australia.

The service provides:

  • Weekly news updates throughout the growing season
  • Risk alerts
  • Management information and advice.

PestFax is co-funded with GRDC investment through the National Pest Information Service project (NPIS) and is delivered by the WA Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD).

Growers are encouraged to use the service to report pests and diseases they are seeing in the paddock and check the latest advice about which plant diseases and insect pests are currently posing a risk to their crops and pastures.

SEE ALSO:

A wide network of growers, field agronomists, consultants and industry specialists provide weekly input into the PestFax newsletter that is distributed during the winter crop season and PestFax apps.

This interactive input helps ensure that the best diagnostic and control methods are recommended to growers and industry in-season, when it counts most.

PestFax can be obtained by sending a request to PestFax@dpird.wa.gov.au for a free subscription.

To make an online pest or disease report, or to send a message, go to this link or email: PestFax@dpird.wa.gov.au.

The online PestFax Map is another useful tool to see where pest and disease problems are occurring.

GRDC's NPIS project aims to provide timely and scientifically rigorous information and guidance to advisers, growers and other service providers about invertebrate pest identification, incursions and management in the main grain growing regions of Australia.

Other project partners in the NPIS project include; Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (QDAF), cesar and South Australia Research and Development Institute.

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