The week that was: May 5 - May 11

The week that was: May 5 - May 11

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 'Walyoo' farm manager Mark Drake, left, and Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development researcher Giacomo Betti. PHOTO Evan Collis

'Walyoo' farm manager Mark Drake, left, and Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development researcher Giacomo Betti. PHOTO Evan Collis

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We take a look back at GroundCover stories making headlines this past week.

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There was plenty happening across the Australian grains industry over this past week.

Here, we take a look back at the top five stories that you read from May 5 to May 11.

Poor harvester set-up costs industry millions: Australian growers are leaving hundreds of thousands of tonnes of their canola crops on the ground, with some individual losses estimated at about 15 per cent of total crop yields.

Drop trays fit on the underside of the harvester with electromagnets and can be dropped to the ground by remote control. PHOTO Peter Newman

Drop trays fit on the underside of the harvester with electromagnets and can be dropped to the ground by remote control. PHOTO Peter Newman

Measuring these losses, followed by making simple changes to the set-up of your harvester, could add thousands of dollars to your harvest profits every year, according to Planfarm's Peter Newman.

Higher canopy temperatures identified in WA spaded trial plots: When corporate farming group Lawson Grains went on a quest to improve water repellent sandy soils on a property at Regans Ford, in Western Australia, little did the company know that - together with local researchers - it would potentially stumble across a partial solution to the devastating effects of frost.

In October 2016, Lawson Grains 'Walyoo' farm manager Mark Drake, and his consultant Erin Cahill, came across this finding after noticing spaded plots, in a Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) managed trial, appeared to look better immediately after a frost event, compared to all other treatments.

Rohan Marold seeding on his Esperance farm in 2012. PHOTO: Evan Collis

Rohan Marold seeding on his Esperance farm in 2012. PHOTO: Evan Collis

Take a look at seeding time across the country over the years: With early seeding underway in parts of Western Australia, we thought we'd dig into our archives to look at some of the country's seeding photographic highlights over the years.

From Badgingarra, in Western Australia, in 2012, to seeding at dusk in Three Springs, WA, in July 2018, here is a collection of our top photographs from seeding time over the years.

Dr Neil Fettell, who recently passed away, pictured in a 2011 NSW Department of Primary Industries water-use efficiency trial with GRDC investment at Condobolin, NSW. PHOTO Nicole Baxter

Dr Neil Fettell, who recently passed away, pictured in a 2011 NSW Department of Primary Industries water-use efficiency trial with GRDC investment at Condobolin, NSW. PHOTO Nicole Baxter

Industry mourns passing of Dr Neil Fettell: The grains industry recently lost one of its leading lights in Dr Neil Fettell who passed away in March after a long battle with an aggressive form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. He was 70.

DPIRD research officer Wayne Parker is investigating the costs and benefits of topsoil slotting plates in the deep ripping process.

DPIRD research officer Wayne Parker is investigating the costs and benefits of topsoil slotting plates in the deep ripping process.

Deep ripping trial results show importance of understanding soil types: Results from deep ripping trials across Western Australia are illustrating the importance of understanding your soil types before investing in soil amelioration strategies.

A total of seven trials were run at Binnu (two trials), Beacon, Moora, Ongerup, Broomehill and Munglinup, investigating the longevity of the benefits from deep ripping, and topsoil slotting plates on yields.

Soil types included various yellow sands, morrell soil, duplex sand over clay, duplex sand over gravel, clay duplex.

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