Legumes in acid soils booklet online

Guide drives success of pulses and legumes in acid soils


Legumes & Pulses
NSW DPI development officer Helen Burns says to apply lime at least two years in advance of growing an acid-sensitive crop. PHOTO NSWDPI

NSW DPI development officer Helen Burns says to apply lime at least two years in advance of growing an acid-sensitive crop. PHOTO NSWDPI

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Online resource now available to help grow better pulse crops and legume pastures on acid soils

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A new guide to managing pulse crops and legume pastures in acid soils offers strategies to address subsurface acidity and produce more profitable crops and pastures.

GRDC and the NSW Department of Primary Industries (DPI), produced Legumes in acid soils, in response to findings from surveys across Victoria, South Australia, Tasmania and NSW.

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NSWDPIs Helen Burns says forward planning and proactive management of soil acidity is fundamental to improving the production potential of acid-sensitive pulses.

If subsurface acidity is not corrected, poor nodulation may result," she says.

"This is even in cases where good inoculation practices are followed."

The new Legumes in acid soils booklet outlines how to improve production potential, yield and nitrogen fixation of pulses.

By focusing on agronomic practices that minimise the negative impacts of low pH and other stress factors on nodulation and the early growth, Ms Burns says growers have a far greater chance of achieving production potential in terms of yield and nitrogen fixation.

Go to GRDCs website via https://grdc.com.au/legumes-in-acidic-soils to find and download the booklet Legumes in acid soils.

More information: Helen Burns, 0427 721 816, helen.burns@dpi.nsw.gov.au

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